At the current deforestation rate, tropical rain forests will be gone by 2040.














Our Solution: Reforest the Rain Forest
Everything points to the immanent destruction of the natural rain forests because the world demands more of the treasured hardwoods than can grow in them. In good conscience, many buyers no longer justify securing tropical hardwoods from sources that deplete the natural rain forests. England pays a 13% premium to suppliers of tropical hardwoods from sustainable growth forests. Because existing tree farms supply only a fraction of the demand, many more trees can be planted.
Planting and harvesting tropical hardwoods for profit in professionally managed tree plantations is a logical solution. Let’s leave the natural tropical rain forests to grow as nature intended and enjoy an extremely lucrative investment, while improving life on the planet.
Modern technology, advanced learning from universities, and best practices from existing tree farms have furthered this industry. Nevertheless, it is almost inconceivable that enough tree plantations can be established to keep prices of tropical hardwoods from skyrocketing further.

This is an excellent position for a tree owner!


Tropical hardwoods of Southeast Asia, until recently a primary supply, will be all but depleted by 2010. All of the main tropical rain forests in India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh are gone, as are those in Ivory Coast and Nigeria. This depletion has buyers heading to Central America.
A 1995 NASA satellite month-long survey of Brazil recorded 39,889 individual fires, up 370% from the same month of the previous year. Fewer than 2 billion acres of tropical rain forests are left—for the moment. They are cleared by 30 to 50 million acres per year. In 10 to 15 years, rain forests will no longer sustain this rate of cutting.

Population Exacerbation:
Globally, population has more than doubled since 1950 with the fastest growth in the tropics, where three billion people now live. Scientists predict that the rate of deforestation will accelerate as this burgeoning population competes for and claims more land. The April 2005 version of the U.S. Census Bureau International Data Base projects the world’s population at roughly 6.8 billion by 2010.


Notice that in 1940 there were approximately 2.8 billion acres of rain forest. By 1990, there were only 1.8 billion acres, a drop of 1 billion acres of rainforest in 50 years. Another 1 billion acres will have disappeared by 2010, a span of 30 years. At the present rate the last .8 billion acres will be gone by 2040.

Alternative Resources:
Professionally managed tree farms take a fraction of the strain off natural tropical rain forests. They also provide a source of income for the local population. Attracting foreign direct investment.


Situation Anaysis
Even though there is destruction, governments of economically developing countries, where tropical rain forests are, want income and the foreign currency derived from hardwood sales.
Professionally managed tree farms take a fraction of the strain off natural tropical rain forests.
Until the deforestation tide turns, it remains imperative that we must Invest in Tree Plantations.
Environmental awareness is taking root:
Efforts to ban rain forest exploitation are yielding results. Success is evident in Thailand, which banned logging in 1988, and Costa Rica is re-greening by protecting 26% of its land in national parks or reserves. In January 2007 Honduras elected their President on his promise of, “We care about forests.” Globally, awareness of and concern for the irrevocable damage from harvesting hardwoods from the natural rain forests are growing.

More Tolls:
More pressure is placed on natural rain forests when trillions of dollars worth of oil, gas, uranium, gold, iron, bauxite and other minerals are found beneath their floors. Related are the costs associated with the clearing and settlement for those who log, mine, drill, ranch or farm, in addition to the loss from large hydro dams, the charcoal industry and subsistence farming. Government regulations are starting to protect this valuable resource.

A Catch 22:
High dollars for specialty tropical timber push loggers deeper into the last of our rain forests. Behind the loggers come land-hungry locals who finish the destruction through slash-and-burn agriculture methods.
But even though there is a tremendous amount of destruction, governments of economically developing countries, where tropical rain forests are, want the short-term solution of immediate income and the foreign currency derived from hardwood sales.